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Abstract: Session E  4:30 pm (Back to Session E)
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Capturing Stormwater with a “Kitchen Sink” of Solutions in Anne Arundel County, MD

Mark Southerland, PhD, PMP
AKRF, Inc.
Hanover, MD

Authors:
Art Wawiernia and Mark Southerland, AKRF
Greg LeBlanc and Joe Ports, Anne Arundel County

AKRF is designing stormwater solutions, including pervious pavement, pond retrofit, bio-infiltration, step pool stormwater conveyance, and stream and wetland restoration, at four sites in Anne Arundel County, MD. The sites range from a concrete channel adjacent to a major highway to streams and wetlands in the Severn Run Natural Environment Area. The three Patapsco Tributary projects in northern Anne Arundel County are among the first to employ a suite of green stormwater infrastructure solutions. The northernmost project is Riverside Park, where a concrete channel that runs alongside Interstate 895 before passing into the Patapsco River is being converted to a step pool stormwater conveyance. The middle project is demonstrating the value of pervious pavement and infiltration trench with bio-infiltration forebays at the Brooklyn Park athletic fields. The southernmost project includes the enhancement of an existing stormwater outfall with surface and sub-surface infiltration at the Chesapeake Arts Center. Near the Millersville Post Office, AKRF is designing a multi-faceted solution to severe erosion from stormwater runoff in a tributary to Severn Run. Immediately west of I-97, an inadequate drainage ditch and pond allow runoff to pass under Najoles Road resulting in unstable 15-foot banks along a downcut stream.  Combined with additional runoff from the south, large quantities of sediment have been mobilized and transported downstream to the Severn Run Natural Environment Area owned by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources (DNR).  Under a Memorandum of Understanding with DNR, the County has tasked AKRF with (1) retrofitting the ditch and stormwater pond, (2) completing 1800 LF of stream and wetland restoration, and (3) stabilizing the steep eroding gully from the south. These projects together illustrate how Anne Arundel County is managing stormwater through the full “kitchen sink” of solutions to meet NPDES MS4 permit requirements and improve water quality throughout their communities.